Saturday, September 16, 2017

LOFT Graduate Wins National Miss Amazing

Megan Swanson, one of my AV graduates was recognized in the AG Bell Associations' Featured News for winning the 2017 National Miss Amazing Miss Title.



Tuesday, September 12, 2017

SEPTEMBER - Listening and Spoken Language Calendar

Click HERE to download the free SEPTEMBER printable calendar with daily Listening and Spoken Language suggestions for families from the Moog Center.



Wednesday, September 6, 2017

Free Professional Development Courses from CID


Did you hear CENTRAL INSTITUTE FOR THE DEAF online learning courses For Professional Development is now FREE? Watch ALL of CID's online learning courses on the website! CID made this change to ensure more professionals have access to the information they need to support students with hearing loss. Click the following link to view all of the available topics: http://bit.ly/2eL4jkj


Monday, August 21, 2017

ASHA Leader Tips to Involve Parents and AVT Principles

Did you read the article in the ASHA Leader yesterday? My 4 Favorite Tips to Involve Parents in Treatment August 17, 2017, By Jonathan Suarez?  It corresponds with our Auditory Verbal Principles of guiding and coaching families.



Jonathan Suarez, MS, CCC-SLP,  shares that SLPs are experts in speech and language development whereas, parents, however, are experts on their child.  Like LSL practitioners Jonathan suggests we take advantage of this time and teach the parent simple ways to help their child every day.

He wrote about a child who had SLP sessions twice a week for 18 months which comes out to 156 sessions.

Jonathan said,  "If I went to 156:

personal training sessions, then I better be all muscle.

cooking lessons, then I should cook like a master chef.

college courses, I could earn at least two degrees, maybe three.

coached basketball practices, I might finally accomplish my life-long goal of being an NBA player.

finally, as a parent, if I attended 156 speech-language sessions, I hope I learned enough to help my child work on the concepts at home."

I thought this was an illustration we can share with parents or colleagues who still believe more therapy must be better.  We know that coaching parents and getting other family members involved usually allows the child to make faster progress.

Click HERE to read the

Saturday, August 19, 2017

THIS IS WHY - I'm an Audiologist and an Auditory Verbal Therapist

Today, Bryn, Lauren, and Megan tell their own stories and we no longer have to convince naysayers that children who are deaf and hard of hearing can listen and speak. 

Auditory Verbal Family Picnic
Bryn Spejcher, Chelsea & Lauren O'Brien and Megan Swanson

It is a privilege
 to be a trusted member and walk beside families
 on their listening and spoken language journey.

Bryn, Megan and Lauren at AG Bell LOFT 2008
Leadership Opportunities For Teens 

Over 20 years later. Amazing, successful woman
 who I am blessed to call dear friends.


Bryn Spejcher and Lynn Wood
Lauren O'Brien, Lynn Wood and Megan Swanson




















Listening and Spoken Language therapy makes it possible for children who are deaf or hard of hearing to learn to listen and talk, which powers language, literacy and lifetime success. _ www.HearingFirst.com

Friday, August 18, 2017

YouTubers - Make a Back To School Video With Tips For Hearing At School


So you want to be a YouTube Star. Here's your chance. 

 Not!

Listen to Monrovia share her 3-minute video, then create your own video with your back to school hearing loss tips for the teachers.
  

If you up for the challenge make a video for the kids at school! 

Send me the link and I will post it! 

You'll be on your way to stardom!

Monday, August 14, 2017

It's Come Full Circle! Celebrating Bryn P. Spejcher, Au.D.


It Comes Full Circle 

What a privilege to partner with the Mike and Laurie Spejcher and their family along their LSL Auditory Verbal journey. We celebrated Bryn this weekend and her accomplishment of earning a doctorate in audiology. 

Bryn P. Spejcher, Au.D., CCC-A is beginning her career at the House Children’s Hearing Center of UCLA, Los Angeles. 

Pay it forward Bryn!






Friday, August 4, 2017

AUGUST - Listening and Spoken Language Calendar

Click HERE to download the free AUGUST printable calendar with daily Listening and Spoken Language suggestions for families from the Moog Center.





Thursday, August 3, 2017

Talk Time NOT Screen Time But...

I often am questioned by parents who know that listening, language and social skills are learned best when interacting with children and apps together but there are times when they want or need their child to listen and play independently.

Q - ”Lynn, I've heard that one of the most important part of using apps for listening and spoken language development is to interact with my child while he's using the app(s).  What about the times when I'm just exhausted and want my child to play an app by himself?”


A - Dear Parent,

Listening, language and social skills are learned best when interacting with children and apps together. But rest assured, there are many well-chosen apps that open an universe of books, games and music for listening and spoken language learning. Apps can provide practice for your child listening to a variety of speakers or voices. Some apps allow you to choose to allow background music which is an auditory challenge for older kids.

Apps that I recommend for a child to play independently would be those that target following auditory directions, storytelling and identifying sounds in our environment. Below are some of my favorites.

Classic Stories By Nosy Crow 

Fun With Directions Apps By Hamaguchi  (There are free lite versions available)

One Step Two Step by Synapse Apps, LLC (There is a free lite version)

Funny Directions By Speecharoo Apps

Food Frenzy Following Directions By Super Duper Publications

Seasonal Directions By ViritualSpeechCenter

Auditory Memory For Quick Stories  By Super Duper Publications

Sound Touch By Sound Touch

Touch The Sound By Alligator Apps

Wednesday, July 26, 2017

SLIME- An Experiential Auditory Verbal Project


Making cool, colorful SLIME was an easy listening and language rich project that the kids loved! We targeting simple auditory directions, auditory sequencing, action and descriptive vocabulary plus so much more!


Click Here For The Three Ingredient Recipe

Friday, July 21, 2017

Picnic Fun in Auditory Verbal Therapy

Picnic Fun Across The Ages and Stages

1. Identify the child's goals
2. A Picnic Theme has limitless possibilities in your session and for carryover at home.

This week at the Auditory Verbal Center of Wheaton

What a picnic!

Barbeque Party Game 

Barrier Game and Critical Elements While Making Sandwiches

No session is complete without a good book and a song or two.

Target listening and spoken language goals with this interactive shared screen two player BBQ App BAMBA

Thursday, July 20, 2017

IEP PREPARATION: CRITICAL INFORMATION YOU NEED

Blogger Eric Sherman shares knowledge and lessons learned from his parent's perspective on raising a child that is deaf or hard of hearing and uses  cochlear implants to listen and talk.

Check out this post that was created by a link on the blog Ci Wear News Splash:

Eric writes, 


If you are a parent of a child with a disability (e.g. hearing loss, autism, dyslexia, etc.) most likely you are receiving or will be receiving services from the school through an Individualized Education Plan (IEP).  As a parent, you are an important part of the IEP team and the process to develop the best educational plan that meets your child’s needs. 

Individualized Education Plan (IEP) meeting can cause a lot of anxiety for people, especially if you are anxious to get services in place to help your child at school. Far too often, parents will attend meetings unprepared without the proper information to be a productive participant in the development of their child’s IEP.


While at an IEP meeting, if you let the school present reports and goals to you, you are setting yourself up for a long and a potentially stressful experience.  Depending on your child’s disability the information provided can be daunting and tough to process often leading to a very unproductive, sometimes combative and emotionally draining meeting. 


As a parent, I got defensive after first hearing my son’s assessment reports. Instead of focusing on how to help create the best education plan to benefit my child, I was angry and arguing about what was being reported about my child.

Picture from Schoolpsychologyfiles.com

Often parents go into an IEP meeting trying to guess what the school is going to present…this is a big mistake.  As a parent, you have equal rights under the law to be an active participant in shaping your child’s education plan. Too many parents go to IEP meetings without information regarding their child’s educational needs. 


Prepare yourself; if it is an initial IEP or an annual review, you have the right to review present level performance reports and any assessments, as well as request suggested goals from service providers prior to your meeting.  These goals will need to be discussed and agreed to at the IEP meeting. 
  

We request the school to provide us with our son’s reports and suggested goals, at least 5 days prior to the scheduled meeting.  It is customary for the IEP team members to contact us in advance to discuss our son’s present level of performance and thoughts about goals.    For us, this has been the easiest and most efficient way to create the best education plan for our son. 


Here’s a version of an email I’ve sent, copying all the service providers, requesting information:


Dear {school administer},


For our child’s upcoming IEP review {date}, we request copies of all assessments, present level performance reports and suggested goals prior to our meeting.  This information will help us prepare and engage in a constructive manner that will help the IEP process move more efficiently.  Generally, there is a lot of information presented at our son’s IEP meeting and having this information (at least 5 days in advance) will help us get through the meeting in a shorter period of time.



We invite anyone on our child’s IEP team to contact us with any questions.  We can be reached by email or phone. We look forward to receiving the requested information as soon as available or at least 5 days prior to the scheduled IEP date.


Thank you for your help in this matter.
Sincerely,



By requesting this information prior to our IEP meetings, we’ve been able to move through the IEP process more effectively. This has enabled us to spend more time addressing appropriate goals and services and less time on reading and processing reports.   In many cases, the suggested goals provided prior to the meeting were appropriate for our child.  Thus, we were able to move on to goals and services that we felt needed to be discussed further.  Other times, the reports and suggested goals forewarned us there was going to be an issue with particular services. 


IEP’s can become very adversarial and stressful, especially if you feel you’ve been blindsided by the school.  Being alerted to possible issues, allows you time to investigate a solution and to discuss with the IEP team or it prepares you to look at your options if there is going to be a disagreement.


One of the reports and suggested goals we received prior to the IEP alerted us that the school was engaging in inappropriate and unprofessional behavior that violated our parental rights.  We made certain that this behavior was well documented at the IEP meeting in case we needed to go to due process.  To become more informed and learn the specifics to what we did, please click here and we will email part 2 of our story to you.


Remember YOU are an essential part of developing an appropriate education plan for your child.  

Requesting reports and suggested goals, prior to your IEP will help you save time; keep you focused and better prepared to discuss your child’s educational needs.   It may alleviate some of the stress and anxieties that are associated with IEP’s.  It has certainly been helpful for us.

Tuesday, July 18, 2017

JULY - Listening and Spoken Language Calendar

Click HERE to download the free July printable calendar with daily Listening and Spoken Language suggestions for families from the Moog Center.



Friday, July 14, 2017

MAKING FRESH-SQUEEZED LEMONADE


ACROSS THE AGES AND STAGES IN AUDITORY VERBAL THERAPY










video

video





1. AUDITORY COMPREHENSION AND USE OF TARGETED NOUNS, VERBS AND ADJECTIVES:

 BE CREATIVE! EXPAND YOUR CHILD'S CURRENT LISTENING AND LANGUAGE SKILLS.

NOUNS: LEMONS,  LEMONADE, PEEL, FRUIT, PULP....
VERBS: SQUEEZE, SLICE, TWIST, JUICE...
ADJECTIVES: YELLOW, SOUR, TART, STICKY

2. AUDITORY MEMORY, AUDITORY ASSOCIATION, KNOWLEDGE:

 HELP A FRIEND MAKE LEMONADE BY TELLING THEM THE RECIPE AND STEPS.

3. AUDITORY COMPREHENSION AND EXPRESSIVE USE OF AND CONCEPTS:

WHOLE/HALF/PART
ALL/SOME/NONE
FIRST, SECOND...LAST
FIRST AND THEN
BEFORE/AFTER

4. AUDITORY MEMORY AND SEQUENCING:

TAKE A VIDEO OR DRAW STICK FIQURE DIRECTIONS.
 THEN SEQUENCE THE RECIPE PICTURE CARDS IN CORRECT ORDER AND RETELL THE STORY

5. HAVE YOUR CHILD LISTEN TO YOU TELL THE LEMONADE STORY. 

 USE A "STORY TRACKING" TECHNIQUE TO TARGET CLEAR SPEECH, "LITTLE WORDS" ETC.


6. AUDITORY SEQUENCING AND RETELLING WITH TARGETED VERB TENSES 

PRESENT PROGRESSIVE: 

LYNN IS SLICING THE LEMON IN HALF.
SQUEEZING THE JUICE MAKES MY HAND HURT.
LYNN IS MAKING A FUNNY SOUR FACE AND PUCKERING HER LIPS


PRESENT TENSE: 

LYNN SQUEEZES THE JUICE FROM THE LEMON.
LYNN SMELLS THE SOUR FRUIT.
LYNN SPILLS THE SUGAR ON THE TABLE

REGULAR PAST TENSE:

LYNN POURED THE JUICE INTO THE CUPS.
LYNN ADDED SUGAR TO THE JAR.
LYNN MEASURED THE SUGAR AND STIRRED THE LEMONADE.


IRREGULAR PAST TENSE:

LYNN THREW AWAY THE LEMON PEEL.
WE ALL DRANK THE DELICIOUS BUT SOUR LEMONADE.


7. TELL SOMEONE ELSE HOW YOU MADE LEMONADE USING YOUR 

AUDITORY MEMORY, AUDITORY SEQUENCING SKILLS AND DESCRIPTIVE LANGUAGE ABILITIES


8. USE CRITICAL THINKING SKILL AND TALK ABOUT HOW YOU WOULD MAKE ORANGE JUICE.


Wednesday, July 5, 2017

2017 AG Bell LSL Symposium GET IN THE GAME Handouts

If you attended my presentation at the 2017 AG Bell Listening and Spoken Language Symposium and would like a list of the games I shared drop me an email at:


Monday, July 3, 2017

Start with the Brain and Connect the Dots - The Logic Chain

Hearing First commissioned Dr. Carol Flexer, Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Audiology, University of Akron. I am so fortunate to have first met Carol in my junior year at the U of Akron. Carol took me under her wings, guided and coached me and I studied under her throughout graduate school, my CFY and the early years of my career. I am still learning from her today. 
 Dr. Carol Flexer has gathered, analyzed and synthesized the latest supporting research surrounding how children with hearing loss develop literacy through LSL. As a result of her work, a white paper has been created that features a logic chain comprising of research to connect the dots between basic brain biology and the development of literacy during elementary school.
Download the document to read the research and learn how children with hearing loss develop literacy through Listening and Spoken Language (LSL).