Friday, July 21, 2017

Picnic Fun in Auditory Verbal Therapy

Picnic Fun Across The Ages and Stages

1. Identify the child's goals
2. A Picnic Theme has limitless possibilities in your session and for carryover at home.

This week at the Auditory Verbal Center of Wheaton

What a picnic!

Barbeque Party Game 

Barrier Game and Critical Elements While Making Sandwiches

No session is complete without a good book and a song or two.

Target listening and spoken language goals with this interactive shared screen two player BBQ App BAMBA

Thursday, July 20, 2017

IEP PREPARATION: CRITICAL INFORMATION YOU NEED

Blogger Eric Sherman shares knowledge and lessons learned from his parent's perspective on raising a child that is deaf or hard of hearing and uses  cochlear implants to listen and talk.

Check out this post that was created by a link on the blog Ci Wear News Splash:

Eric writes, 


If you are a parent of a child with a disability (e.g. hearing loss, autism, dyslexia, etc.) most likely you are receiving or will be receiving services from the school through an Individualized Education Plan (IEP).  As a parent, you are an important part of the IEP team and the process to develop the best educational plan that meets your child’s needs. 

Individualized Education Plan (IEP) meeting can cause a lot of anxiety for people, especially if you are anxious to get services in place to help your child at school. Far too often, parents will attend meetings unprepared without the proper information to be a productive participant in the development of their child’s IEP.


While at an IEP meeting, if you let the school present reports and goals to you, you are setting yourself up for a long and a potentially stressful experience.  Depending on your child’s disability the information provided can be daunting and tough to process often leading to a very unproductive, sometimes combative and emotionally draining meeting. 


As a parent, I got defensive after first hearing my son’s assessment reports. Instead of focusing on how to help create the best education plan to benefit my child, I was angry and arguing about what was being reported about my child.

Picture from Schoolpsychologyfiles.com

Often parents go into an IEP meeting trying to guess what the school is going to present…this is a big mistake.  As a parent, you have equal rights under the law to be an active participant in shaping your child’s education plan. Too many parents go to IEP meetings without information regarding their child’s educational needs. 


Prepare yourself; if it is an initial IEP or an annual review, you have the right to review present level performance reports and any assessments, as well as request suggested goals from service providers prior to your meeting.  These goals will need to be discussed and agreed to at the IEP meeting. 
  

We request the school to provide us with our son’s reports and suggested goals, at least 5 days prior to the scheduled meeting.  It is customary for the IEP team members to contact us in advance to discuss our son’s present level of performance and thoughts about goals.    For us, this has been the easiest and most efficient way to create the best education plan for our son. 


Here’s a version of an email I’ve sent, copying all the service providers, requesting information:


Dear {school administer},


For our child’s upcoming IEP review {date}, we request copies of all assessments, present level performance reports and suggested goals prior to our meeting.  This information will help us prepare and engage in a constructive manner that will help the IEP process move more efficiently.  Generally, there is a lot of information presented at our son’s IEP meeting and having this information (at least 5 days in advance) will help us get through the meeting in a shorter period of time.



We invite anyone on our child’s IEP team to contact us with any questions.  We can be reached by email or phone. We look forward to receiving the requested information as soon as available or at least 5 days prior to the scheduled IEP date.


Thank you for your help in this matter.
Sincerely,



By requesting this information prior to our IEP meetings, we’ve been able to move through the IEP process more effectively. This has enabled us to spend more time addressing appropriate goals and services and less time on reading and processing reports.   In many cases, the suggested goals provided prior to the meeting were appropriate for our child.  Thus, we were able to move on to goals and services that we felt needed to be discussed further.  Other times, the reports and suggested goals forewarned us there was going to be an issue with particular services. 


IEP’s can become very adversarial and stressful, especially if you feel you’ve been blindsided by the school.  Being alerted to possible issues, allows you time to investigate a solution and to discuss with the IEP team or it prepares you to look at your options if there is going to be a disagreement.


One of the reports and suggested goals we received prior to the IEP alerted us that the school was engaging in inappropriate and unprofessional behavior that violated our parental rights.  We made certain that this behavior was well documented at the IEP meeting in case we needed to go to due process.  To become more informed and learn the specifics to what we did, please click here and we will email part 2 of our story to you.


Remember YOU are an essential part of developing an appropriate education plan for your child.  

Requesting reports and suggested goals, prior to your IEP will help you save time; keep you focused and better prepared to discuss your child’s educational needs.   It may alleviate some of the stress and anxieties that are associated with IEP’s.  It has certainly been helpful for us.

Tuesday, July 18, 2017

JULY - Listening and Spoken Language Calendar

Click HERE to download the free July printable calendar with daily Listening and Spoken Language suggestions for families from the Moog Center.



Friday, July 14, 2017

MAKING FRESH-SQUEEZED LEMONADE


ACROSS THE AGES AND STAGES IN AUDITORY VERBAL THERAPY










video

video





1. AUDITORY COMPREHENSION AND USE OF TARGETED NOUNS, VERBS AND ADJECTIVES:

 BE CREATIVE! EXPAND YOUR CHILD'S CURRENT LISTENING AND LANGUAGE SKILLS.

NOUNS: LEMONS,  LEMONADE, PEEL, FRUIT, PULP....
VERBS: SQUEEZE, SLICE, TWIST, JUICE...
ADJECTIVES: YELLOW, SOUR, TART, STICKY

2. AUDITORY MEMORY, AUDITORY ASSOCIATION, KNOWLEDGE:

 HELP A FRIEND MAKE LEMONADE BY TELLING THEM THE RECIPE AND STEPS.

3. AUDITORY COMPREHENSION AND EXPRESSIVE USE OF AND CONCEPTS:

WHOLE/HALF/PART
ALL/SOME/NONE
FIRST, SECOND...LAST
FIRST AND THEN
BEFORE/AFTER

4. AUDITORY MEMORY AND SEQUENCING:

TAKE A VIDEO OR DRAW STICK FIQURE DIRECTIONS.
 THEN SEQUENCE THE RECIPE PICTURE CARDS IN CORRECT ORDER AND RETELL THE STORY

5. HAVE YOUR CHILD LISTEN TO YOU TELL THE LEMONADE STORY. 

 USE A "STORY TRACKING" TECHNIQUE TO TARGET CLEAR SPEECH, "LITTLE WORDS" ETC.


6. AUDITORY SEQUENCING AND RETELLING WITH TARGETED VERB TENSES 

PRESENT PROGRESSIVE: 

LYNN IS SLICING THE LEMON IN HALF.
SQUEEZING THE JUICE MAKES MY HAND HURT.
LYNN IS MAKING A FUNNY SOUR FACE AND PUCKERING HER LIPS


PRESENT TENSE: 

LYNN SQUEEZES THE JUICE FROM THE LEMON.
LYNN SMELLS THE SOUR FRUIT.
LYNN SPILLS THE SUGAR ON THE TABLE

REGULAR PAST TENSE:

LYNN POURED THE JUICE INTO THE CUPS.
LYNN ADDED SUGAR TO THE JAR.
LYNN MEASURED THE SUGAR AND STIRRED THE LEMONADE.


IRREGULAR PAST TENSE:

LYNN THREW AWAY THE LEMON PEEL.
WE ALL DRANK THE DELICIOUS BUT SOUR LEMONADE.


7. TELL SOMEONE ELSE HOW YOU MADE LEMONADE USING YOUR 

AUDITORY MEMORY, AUDITORY SEQUENCING SKILLS AND DESCRIPTIVE LANGUAGE ABILITIES


8. USE CRITICAL THINKING SKILL AND TALK ABOUT HOW YOU WOULD MAKE ORANGE JUICE.


Wednesday, July 5, 2017

2017 AG Bell LSL Symposium GET IN THE GAME Handouts

If you attended my presentation at the 2017 AG Bell Listening and Spoken Language Symposium and would like a list of the games I shared drop me an email at:


Monday, July 3, 2017

Start with the Brain and Connect the Dots - The Logic Chain

Hearing First commissioned Dr. Carol Flexer, Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Audiology, University of Akron. I am so fortunate to have first met Carol in my junior year at the U of Akron. Carol took me under her wings, guided and coached me and I studied under her throughout graduate school, my CFY and the early years of my career. I am still learning from her today. 
 Dr. Carol Flexer has gathered, analyzed and synthesized the latest supporting research surrounding how children with hearing loss develop literacy through LSL. As a result of her work, a white paper has been created that features a logic chain comprising of research to connect the dots between basic brain biology and the development of literacy during elementary school.
Download the document to read the research and learn how children with hearing loss develop literacy through Listening and Spoken Language (LSL).




Sunday, July 2, 2017

A Visit To The Volta Bureau. Washington D.C. AG BELL Association


Enjoyed an evening connecting with friends at “A Night in Georgetown” hosted at the historic Volta Bureau for AGBell Listening and Spoken Language Symposium attendees.







Alexander Graham Bell and Me!

Honored to get my photo with the late great
Alexander Graham Bell.
Wink, wink!
Look closely. #agbell2017





Tuesday, June 27, 2017

Apps for Rehabilitation Specialists by Med-El

MED-EL Rehabilitation Apps are available for iOS or Android devices, these 3 applications can save you time by helping you electronically store and share information with patients and their families, all while avoiding the cost of ordering and printing paper resources. 


1. Common Objects Token Test

2. Auditory Skills Checklist
3. Hear Today

Monday, June 26, 2017

Join Lynn Wood at the 2017 AG Bell Listening and Spoken Language Symposium


 The session participants will:
  1. Gain knowledge and skills in choosing and implementing activities, apps and games that can be valuable tools for maximizing LSL, literacy and communication success.
  2. Describe specific LSL techniques and strategies when using the games and activities in therapy sessions and educational lessons.
  3. Become familiar with some current auditory (re)habilitation tools and resources which support LSL outcomes.

Program Abstract:
You understand the principles of Listening and Spoken Language, now put them to work!   Learn fun, effective, hands-on LSL activities, games, apps and tools to sharpen auditory, language, literacy and communication success in children, teens and adults who are deaf or hard of hearing. Strategies, techniques and best practices for LSL will be incorporated throughout the session.

Modeling LSL based games to be played at home with friends and family is a functional way to engage others in children, teen, and adult auditory learning, communication skills, and carryover. Motivating and valuable LSL materials promote confidence and communication success in hearing aids users and cochlear implant recipients throughout their hearing journey.

Key recommendations and suggestions for engaging materials and tools for LSL sessions and lessons will be discussed. LSL resources and auditory rehabilitation tools commercially available that support listeners of all ages and stages will be highlighted and shared.

Tools for LSL professionals, educational audiologists, hearing itinerants, speech and language pathologists, teachers, parents, caregivers, peers and for the individual who is deaf or hard of hearing will be explored.


The format of this session will be interactive with demonstrations and audience participation.

Tuesday, June 20, 2017

S.T.A.R.R. - Parent Coaching Strategies for Listening and Spoken Language

S.T.A.R.R., a new parent coaching tool for LSL was published by Sunshine Cottage School for Deaf Children of San Antonio, Texas.  S.T.A.R.R. is a simple acronym yet the materials are powerful when guiding parents and caregivers in effective listening and spoken language strategies.

S- Stay close
T- Talk, talk, talk
A- Auditory Environment
R- Reciprocity
R- Repeat Routines

product-starr-bundle-01.jpg

The S.T.A.R.R. strategies are used as a script to guide those who have chosen a Listening and Spoken Language outcome for their child that is deaf or hard of hearing. The points on the STARR can be introduced in isolation or all 5 skills collectively to be used by throughout the waking hours of the child

The Parent Coaching Strategies for Listening and Spoken Language - Booklet - $15 – sold individually
   
S.T.A.R.R. Parent Coaching Strategies for Listening and Spoken Language - Magnetic Stars - $20. - Sold in sets of 10 magnetic stars.




Saturday, June 17, 2017

Cochlear's Sound Start Auidtory Development Posters

This eight-poster series is great to have on the wall in your clinic for easy reference. The posters give you ideas on how to develop the auditory skills of awareness, discrimination, memory, meaning and more. Posters 7 and 8 are a colorful and concise summary of the 20 key strategies for developing listening skills. You will find the ideas and content very helpful.

Monitor and Tracking Scales - From Cochlear Corporation

Cochlear Corporation's Monitoring Scales http://www.cochlear.com/


The Integrated Scales of Development supports the monitoring and tracking of the child’s development from birth to 48 months in the areas of; Listening, Receptive Language, Expressive Language, Speech, Cognition, and Pragmatics. There is also a handy tracking and monitoring form the clinician may want to keep in the child’s file. 

TLC (Tracking Listening Children) is the latest in a long line of habilitation tools developed to

 support your work with parents and children with hearing loss. Following the great success 

of the Sound Foundation series, comes this comprehensive tool to help you track your 

child’s progress and ensure they are achieving milestones in a timely manner.